Mud Fever

Mud Fever

 

Mud Fever is an infection which most commonly affects the  horse’s pastern and heel area and as the name suggests is most frequently seen in muddy and/or wet conditions. Under normal circumstances the skin acts as a protective barrier however continual wetting of the skin can break down this barrier and allow bacteria to enter and cause infection. Generally horses and ponies with white socks are more prone to the condition but Mud Fever will affect horses of all breeds, ages and colour. As with any bacterial infection, mud fever can become a very serious condition very quickly if left untreated. The legs can become swollen and sore and open sores can become quickly infected

 

Clipping the infected area can help the skin to dry out. These handy sized trimmers http://equikro.com/wahl-pro-trimmer2399  are perfect for the finer coated horse. You may need more heavy duty clippers for thicker coats such as http://equikro.com/wahl-pro-series-trimmer . But clipping feathers will not prevent Mud Fever so only do this when the mud fever has established. Washing the infected area with an antiseptic solution such as http://equikro.com/naf-equiclense-500ml or anti bacterial shampoo such as http://equikro.com/cdm-gallop-medicated-shampoo is part of the treatment for mud fever as this helps to very gently remove any scabs or crust. Never pick off dry scabs as this will leave an open wound which will become infected.  As washing a horse's legs repeatedly can remove the natural oils in the skin and may allow the condition to become established the legs should be dried thoroughly after washing. Once the legs have been thoroughly dried heel ointments or a barrier cream such as http://equikro.com/equus-health-mud-guard-450g can be applied before turning out. Turn out boots http://equikro.com/equilibrium-close-contact-chaps or chaps can also be used but these must be clean and dry.